Modals

Modals are essential in English, particularly in business. They help add meaning to your words: you can, may, might, should, have to or must remember this (and each of these is slightly different!).

Modals can express a number of important aspects, such as:

The main areas for us to use modal verbs are the following:
ABILITY/SUCCESS
In order to express that somebody knows how to do something, has the ability
to do something or to refer to an action that is or has been successful – can, be
able to.
ADVICE
When we want to say that it is desirable or correct for something to happen, in
order to give advice to other people – should, ought to.
NECESSITY
When we say that something is necessary or useful, that something is required
– need to, have to.
LACK OF NECESSITY
When we say that something is not necessary or useful, that something is not
required – don't need to, don't have to, needn't.
OBLIGATION
When we want to say that something will definitely happen because the
situation or an authority demands it - have to, must.
PERMISSION
When we say that something is allowed or when we ask whether something is
allowed or not – may, might, can, could, would, be allowed to.
POSSIBILITY
When we want to indicate that something is possible – can, be able to.
PROBABILITY (speculation uses)
When we want to say how certain we are that something will happen – must,
may, might, can't.
PROHIBITION
When we want to express that it is prohibited that something happens –
mustn't.

Revise them in the video (or read here) and do these exercises on more advanced uses:

Last modified: Monday, 15 September 2014, 4:27 PM